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City of Swan

133,303 Population
81,937 Electors
15 Councillors
9% Rate Growth
96 FHI
673 FTE
$164,734,616 Revenue
$135,949,014 Operating Expenditure
$1,377,045,169 Total Value of Assets
2016/17 data is released in the first quarter of 2018.
Suburbs
  • Aveley,
  • Ballajura,
  • Baskerville,
  • Beechboro,
  • Belhus,
  • Bellevue,
  • Brigadoon,
  • Bullsbrook,
  • Caversham,
  • Cullacabardee,
  • Ellenbrook,
  • Gidgegannup,
  • Gnangara,
  • Guildford,
  • Hazelmere,
  • Henley Brook,
  • Herne Hill,
  • Jane Brook,
  • Kiara,
  • Koongamia,
  • Lexia,
  • Lockridge,
  • Malaga,
  • Middle Swan,
  • Midland,
  • Midvale,
  • Millendon,
  • Noranda,
  • Red Hill,
  • South Guildford,
  • Stratton,
  • Swan View,
  • The Vines,
  • Upper Swan,
  • Viveash,
  • West Swan,
  • Whiteman,
  • Woodbridge
Contact Information
2 Midland Square Swan
Phone: (08) 9267 9267
Fax: (08) 9267 9444

Financial Health Indicator


The Financial Health Indicator (FHI) is a measurement of a local government’s overall financial health. It is calculated from the seven financial ratios that local governments are required to calculate annually. An FHI result of 70 and above indicates sound financial health. The maximum result achievable is 100. The FHI is one factor to consider in assessing overall performance. Other factors include: the range of services offered; efficiency of services delivered; and community satisfaction. A very high or low FHI may be a prompt for questions to be asked by the community about a local government’s revenue, expenses and service delivery. The FHI is best viewed as a trend over time. When interpreting FHI data on the radar charts below, a larger rounder shape is better than a smaller shape. Ratio results that are closer to the centre indicate areas where attention may be required and improvement can be made. Find out more information about the FHI methodology (DOCX 1.4MB).

DATA SOURCE: Calculation from financial ratios published in the local government’s Annual Financial Report

Financial Health Indicator Score

*Some values in this chart are unavailable.

Tip: You can turn the years on and off by interacting with the legend dates.

Tip: Looking for additional information? Go to the Table View Screen.

FHI Total Scores
96 2015/2016
97 2014/2015
92 2013/2014
  • Current Ratio

    A measure of the ability of a local government to meet its short-term financial obligations with funds it can access quickly (also known as ‘liquidity’).

  • Asset Consumption Ratio

    A measure of the condition of a local government’s physical assets, by comparing their age with their replacement cost. The ratio highlights the aged condition of a local government’s stock of physical assets.

  • Asset Renewal Ratio

    A measure of a local government’s ability to fund asset renewal and replacements in the future.

  • Asset Sustainability Ratio

    A measure of the extent to which assets managed by a local government are being replaced as they reach the end of their useful lives.

  • Debt Service Cover Ratio

    A measure of a local government’s ability to repay its debt based on how much cash it can access compared to the total of its debt obligations.

  • Operating Surplus Ratio

    A measure of a local government’s ability to cover its operational costs and have money left for capital projects and other purposes.

  • Own Source Revenue Coverage Ratio

    A measure of a local government’s ability to cover its operating costs through revenue it generates itself.


Financial Health Indicator Score

* Indicates data is unavailable.

Financial Health Indicator Comparisons

This graph provides a comparison of Financial Health Indicator results.

DATA SOURCE: Calculation from financial ratios published in the local government’s Annual Financial Report

Hi, This probably wont be used - as we are trying to put all the charts in one area.

About this chart

State FHI Ratio

This is the average FHI result of all local governments in Western Australia.

Metropolitan FHI Average

This is the average FHI result of all local governments in the Perth metropolitan area.

Regional FHI Average

This is the average FHI result of all local governments outside the metropolitan area.

Council

This is the FHI result for the selected council.

Financial Ratios

Under Western Australian legislation, local governments are required to report seven financial ratios. For each ratio, a standard has been set as a benchmark for councils to achieve. The ratios provide a measure of the financial sustainability of local governments and are reported by local governments across Australia. MyCouncil presents ratios starting from the 2011-12 financial year. The requirement for local governments to report their asset consumption ratio and asset renewal funding ratio was introduced in 2012-13. Therefore, asset consumption ratio and asset renewal funding ratio data may not be available before 2012-13.

DATA SOURCE: Local government’s Annual Financial Report

* Indicates data is unavailable.

About this table

Current Score

A measure of the ability of a local government to meet its short-term financial obligations with funds it can access quickly (also known as ‘liquidity’).

Asset Consumption Score

A measure of the condition of a local government’s physical assets, by comparing their age with their replacement cost. The ratio highlights the aged condition of a local government’s stock of physical assets.

Asset Renewal Score

A measure of a local government’s ability to fund asset renewal and replacements in the future.

Asset Sustainability Score

A measure of the extent to which assets managed by a local government are being replaced as they reach the end of their useful lives.

Debt Service Cover Score

A measure of a local government’s ability to repay its debt based on how much cash it can access compared to the total of its debt obligations.

Operating Surplus Score

A measure of a local government’s ability to cover its operational costs and have money left for capital projects and other purposes.

Own Source Revenue Coverage Score

A measure of a local government’s ability to cover its operating costs through revenue it generates itself.

Long-term Liabilities

A local government’s long term or ‘non-current liabilities’ include debt that is due to be paid in a period greater than 12 months, their staff leave entitlements and other liabilities.

DATA SOURCE: Local government’s Annual Financial Report

Value of Assets

Local governments are required to estimate the total value of their assets. Sound asset management ensures that the cost of replacing assets at the end of their useful life is considered in a local government’s long term financial plan.

DATA SOURCE: Local government’s Annual Financial Report

*Some values in this chart are unavailable.
* Indicates data is unavailable.

Operating Revenue


A local government’s revenue comprises all sources of money that contribute to its operating budget. Local governments in Western Australia generate revenue from rates, fees and charges for services, and grants from the State and Commonwealth governments. In some cases, local governments also receive funding through property-developer contributions and sales of assets and property.

DATA SOURCE: Local government Annual Financial Report

Total Operating Revenue

$164,734,616 2015/2016

About this chart

Rates

Rates are a tax on property levied by local governments to fund their activities. The amount of money to come from rates is the shortfall between a local government’s planned expenditure and all other income it receives, including from local government grants.

The Local Government Act 1995 and the Valuation of Land Act 1978 sets out the methods for assessing the rateable value of property and the types of rates which can be levied. Each local government determines a rate in the dollar which is multiplied by the value of the property determined by the Valuer-General.

Operating Grants, Subsidies and Contributions

Each local government in Western Australia receives grants to supplement its other revenue. This includes Financial Assistance Grants from the Commonwealth Government. This money is allocated and distributed to local governments by the WA Local Government Grants Commission.

DATA SOURCE: Western Australian Local Government Grants Commission

Fees and Charges

Most local governments receive income from fees and charges. Examples of when a local government can impose a fee or charge include:

  • the use of, or admission to, facilities owned, managed or maintained by the local government
  • the supply of a service or work at a person’s request
  • the supply of goods
  • provision of information from records
  • receiving an application for approval, making an inspection or issuing a licence or permit.

To meet the cost of providing a special service, a local government can also impose a service charge on owners or occupiers of land who benefit from the service. A common example of a service charge is to meet the cost of installing underground power.

Other Revenue

All revenue from sources not contained in the other categories. This may include (but is not limited to) donations received, fines collected or profits from the sale of assets.

Cash Reserves


Local governments are permitted to set aside money to be used for designated purposes in a future financial year. Reserve accounts may be created for future asset upgrades or replacements, employee costs, specific projects or a number of other initiatives.

DATA SOURCE: Local government Annual Financial Report

Operating Expenditure by Program


Under the Local Government Act 1995, councils must vote to accept an annual budget that sets out the local government’s spending priorities. A local government’s annual budget is informed by its Strategic Community Plan which is developed with the community. Engaging with the community enables a local government to be responsive to community needs and ensures that expenditure and prioritisation of public funds is in line with community expectations. The Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996 specify 11 broad program areas that local governments are to use when reporting expenditure. These program areas are defined below.

DATA SOURCE: Western Australian Local Government Grants Commission

Total Operating Expenditure

$135,949,014 2015/2016

About this chart

Governance

Activities that support local government’s decision-making processes. Includes elected member fees, allowances and administrative support, as well as costs incurred assisting elected members and ratepayers on matters which do not relate to specific council services.

General Purpose Funding

Activities to collect revenue to allow for the provision of services. Includes costs incurred in collecting rates, government grants and other revenue.

Law, Order and Public Safety

Activities to provide services to help ensure a safer community. Includes fire prevention, animal control and other law, order and public safety initiatives.

Health

Activities to provide services to achieve community and environmental health. Includes maternal and infant health, immunisation, pest control and support for general public health initiatives.

Education and Welfare

Activities to provide services to children, youth, seniors and disadvantaged persons. Includes pre-school and other education services, child minding facilities, playgroups, senior citizens’ centres, meals on wheels and home care services.

Housing

Activities to provide and maintain staff housing and support for housing programs.

Community Amenities

Activities to provide services required by the community. Includes rubbish collection and disposal services, litter control, stormwater drainage, environmental protection, public conveniences, cemeteries and town planning schemes.

Recreation and Culture

Activities to provide services and facilities that support the social wellbeing of the community. Includes public halls, civic centres, aquatic and recreation centres, sporting facilities, beaches, parks, gardens, playgrounds, libraries, museums and other cultural facilities.

Transport

Activities to provide transport services to the community. Includes construction and maintenance of local roads, footpaths, cycleways, parking facilities, aerodromes and water transport facilities, and lighting for roads.

Economic Services

Activities to help promote economic and business development. Includes tourism promotion and services, caravan parks and building controls.

Other Property Services

Activities to monitor and control the local government’s assets. Includes private works operation, plant repair, operation costs and engineering costs.

Expenditure by Nature & Type


Local governments are required to report their expenditure by nature and type. Expenditure is classified into five categories defined in the Western Australian Local Government Accounting Manual.

DATA SOURCE: Western Australian Local Government Grants Commission

About this chart

Depreciation on non-current assets

The depreciation calculated on all classes of assets.

Employee Costs

All costs associated with the employment of people including salaries and wages, allowances, benefits and training.

Material and Contracts

Materials and contracts are expenses related to materials purchased by a local government and contracts for services.

Other Expenses

The combination of interest on expenditure, insurance expense, other expenses, and expenditure allocated to capital works.

Utilities

Expenses related to gas, electricity and water use.

Total Annual Operating Expenditure


A local government’s expenditure includes operational and capital projects.

DATA SOURCE: Western Australian Local Government Grants Commission

*Some values in this chart are unavailable.
* Indicates data is unavailable.

Rate Growth


Rates are a tax on property levied by local governments to fund the shortfall between their planned expenditure and all other income they receive, including from local government grants. The Local Government Act 1995 and the Valuation of Land Act 1978 prescribe the methods for assessing the rateable value of property and the types of rates which can be levied. Each local government determines a rate in the dollar which is multiplied by the assigned value of the property. Rate revenue includes general rates, differential rates, specific area rates, minimum rates, interim rates, back rates, ex-gratia rates - less discounts offered. This does not include administration fees, interest on instalments, and interest on arrears or service charges. This graph shows the total growth in local government rate revenue for the local government selected. For more information about your rates contact your local government.

Rate Growth

9.13% 2015/2016

*Some values in this chart are unavailable.
* Indicates data is unavailable.

About this chart

This graph compares increases in total rate revenue with comparative indices.

Local Government Rate Growth

The average increase in total rate revenue of the selected local government.

DATA SOURCE: Local government's Annual Financial Report

Regional Average Rate Growth

The average increase in total rate revenue of all local governments in the Perth regional area.

DATA SOURCE: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Metropolitan Average Growth

The average increase in total rate revenue of all local governments in the Perth metropolitan area.

DATA SOURCE: Australian Bureau of Statistics

State Average Rate Growth

The average increase in total rate revenue of all local governments in Western Australia.

DATA SOURCE: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Local Government Population Growth

The increase in population in the local government district selected.

DATA SOURCE: Australian Bureau of Statistics

WA Population Growth

The increase in population across Western Australia.

DATA SOURCE: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Local Government Employee Cost Growth

A measure of changes in the cost of local government expenditure on employees.

DATA SOURCE: Local government's Annual Financial Report

Regional Employee Cost Growth

A measure of changes in the cost of local government expenditure on employees in the Perth regional area.

DATA SOURCE: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Metro Employee Cost Growth

A measure of changes in the cost of local government expenditure on employees in the Perth metropolitan area.

DATA SOURCE: Australian Bureau of Statistics

WA Employee Cost Growth

A measure of changes in the cost of local government expenditure on employees in Western Australia.

DATA SOURCE: Australian Bureau of Statistics

WA Consumer Price Index

A measure of the average change in the price of a basket of consumer goods and services in Western Australia.

DATA SOURCE: Australian Bureau of Statistics 6401.0 (Perth Metro)

WA Wage Price Index

The average increase in the wages of employees in the Western Australian public sector.

DATA SOURCE: Australian Bureau of Statistics 6345.0 (WA)

WA Producer Price Index

A measure of increases in the cost of capital expenditure in Western Australia.

DATA SOURCE: Australian Bureau of Statistics 6427.0 (WA)

Compliance Audit


Under the Local Government (Audit) Regulations 1996, local governments must complete an annual audit of their compliance with the Act and Regulations. Local governments are required to adopt and publish the Compliance Audit Return within their council’s minutes.

DATA SOURCE: Local government Compliance Audit Return


Total Councillor Renumeration


Councillors, including Mayors and Shire Presidents, receive meeting fees and may receive allowances or have certain council-related expenses reimbursed. The Local Government Act 1995 describes the types of fees, allowances and reimbursable expenses that council members are entitled to claim. The Salaries and Allowances Tribunal sets council member meeting fees and allowances payable. The Local Government (Financial Management) Regulations 1996 requires that local governments report the fees, allowances and reimbursed expenses paid to council members. This table shows the remuneration paid to council as a whole by payment type. This amount does not include interstate and overseas travel paid for by local government or third-parties undertaken on council business.

DATA SOURCE: Local government Annual Financial Report

Gender Diversity


Increasing the gender diversity of councils is a key objective to ensuring that local governments are more representative and reflect the diverse communities they serve. This graph shows a breakdown of publicly elected candidates by gender at each ordinary local government election. This graph excludes vacancies that were filled for a partial term.

DATA SOURCE: Department of Local Government Elections Database
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